Combining a love for natural resources with three decades experience in cultural resources management, Richard Quin has worn many hats in his career, serving as regional historic preservation planner for the South Central Tennessee Development District; an engineering historian, an architectural historian, a landscape historian and a park ranger for the National Park Service; and since returning to Tennessee in 2003, principal planner at Pawpaw, the Nashville-based natural and cultural resource planning firm. Richard’s background in history and historic preservation provides him with the specific skill sets needed for cultural resource assessment and management, while his work as a naturalist and park ranger affords him the ability to work on natural resouces projects. Strong research and writing skills, coupled with in-depth familiarity with historical holdings and archival sources, enables him to place projects in historical context. Work as an interpreter and tourism planner helps him develop meaningful and compelling interpretive panels and devices to explain the significance of any site. Projects include his Cultural Landscape Inventory for the Mumma Farm at Antietam National Battlefield, an Historic Structures Report for Rock Creek Recreational Area in the Cherokee National Forest for structures constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps for the U.S. Forest Service that outlined a strategy to restore the historic structures while meeting contemporary needs, an interpretive plan for historic resources at Tennessee’s Laurel Snow State Natural Area, and the recent Cultural Heritage Mining Trail in Southeast Tennessee.
© 2016 Pawpaw Partners, all rights reserved

our team

At Pawpaw, we have a single focus:

delivering high quality work that

exceeds our clients’ expectations. 

pawpaw

natural and cultural resources planning

Our core staff, supported by a rotating team of historicans, naturalists, resource economists and outdoor recreation specialists, emphasize a public design philosophy for all our plans.
Principal, Planner
Richard Quin
Sherry Beard
Resource Economist
In her role as resource specialist and placemaker at Pawpaw, Sherry combines her love of nature and the environment with her interest in history.  She understands the sensitive balance between capitalizing on a community’s assets and potential to bring benefits to the community and the people who live there while maintaining the uniqueness of place that they value. Sherry has over five years of hands-on experience with Pawpaw in natural and cultural resource inventory, economic and tourism development, and has helped craft interpretive plans for scenic byways and heritage resource projects. A former regional manager and trainer with Girl Scouts, Sherry is an avid outdoorswoman who treasures every opportunity to discover new places and to share them with others.  Her desire to share her outdoor experiences led her to become an outdoor living trainer for Girl Scouts to teach troop leaders the skills they need to nurture a love of the out-of-doors in the girls in their troops.  Additionally, Sherry was an advisor for a Venture Crew through Boy Scouts, a co-ed program for young adults with an emphasis on high adventure and leadership development. She has over 25 years as an accountant working for non-profit organizations to real estate developers as well as guiding small start-up businesses to success.  Sherry is a founder of the Duck River Watershed Association and has served as an officer and board member of several environmental/conservation groups, including Tennessee Scenic Rivers Association (TSRA).
Angela Riffe
Partner, Interpretive Specialist
Angela hails from a rural, agrarian community in West Tennessee. As she watched her hometown’s bustling Main Street turn into a dilapidated No Man’s Land, it piqued her inquisitive nature to discover the differences between flourishing and floundering communities. Since then, she has taken the opportunity to travel and study in a diversity of cities from Bangkok, Thailand, Singapore, and across the US and Europe. Her background in economics, urban planning, and local internships allow her to fully access the complexities of economic vitality in urban spaces. As pastime has grown into profession, Angela dived in with both feet as a resource economist for Pawpaw Partners at their Nashville office. Angela uses her rich experiences to color her perspective as she pursues master’s degrees in public policy and planning. At Pawpaw, Angela has specialized in developing and conducting visitor surveys, collecting demographic information, and data analysis.
Outdoor Recreation Specialist
Carley Lester
Carley grew up hunting and fishing in Middle Tennessee. He obtained his Eagle Scout, BSA in 1975.  Boy Scout camping trips and canoeing the Duck River began to shape his love of the outdoors and natural environment. An opportunity to backpack at Philmont Scout Ranch in northern New Mexico, as a scout, led to a return for backcountry employment at Philmont in 1979.  While attending college at The University of Tennessee in Knoxville, TN, abundant opportunities for mountain expeditions, in all seasons, were enjoyed.   After graduating UTK in 1979 with a degree in Agriculture, he worked as a herdsman on a large cattle and row crop farm in Mt. Pleasant, Tennessee before returning to eastern Tennessee in 1985.  Since 1985, passion for the environment and natural resources has found Carley hiking, camping and fishing in and around Cherokee National Forest Lands.  An agricultural sales career allowed much travel around the areas of eastern Tennessee from Mountain City to Knoxville and even more exploration.  Carley lived on the Nolichucky River in Greene County for 22 years, and spent much free time pursuing smallmouth bass and trout from kayaks or wading. During this time, ATV and UTV travel supplemented hiking. He obtained a private pilot certificate in 1994 and enjoyed flying over many remote areas he had hiked and many more that would be visited later. Carley now resides in Gray in Washington County, Tennessee and teaches Agriculture at Daniel Boone High School.  Environment and Natural Resources curricula, which includes classes in Forestry Management, Plant and Soil Science, and Wildlife Management and Recreation, allows him to instill in his students his passion for natural resource conservation and to teach a balance of anthropocentric and biocentric views of natural resources.  He has taken students on day field trips into wilderness unimproved environments which he hopes will begin to broaden their view of the natural world around them. Students are able to see, hands on-minds on, watersheds they have mapped and areas they have viewed on topographic maps. The reaction of students on these trips has led to an exploration of regulations related to a hiking guide service he hopes to pursue in the future. He is a member of the American Chestnut Foundation, Ducks Unlimited, Asheville Botanical Gardens, and the National Association of Agriculture Educators.  Carley’s outdoor recreation experience and his experience as an educator makes him an ideal addition to the Pawpaw team.  He helps us demonstrate that outdoor recreation opportunities can help craft a strong outdoor tourism component.
SCENICPHOTOGRAPHY

our team

At Pawpaw, we have a single focus: delivering high

quality work that exceeds our clients’ expectations. 

pawpaw
© 2016 Pawpaw Partners
Made with Xara
Principal, Planner
Richard Quin
Combining a love for natural resources with three decades experience in cultural resources management, Richard Quin has worn many hats in his career, serving as regional historic preservation planner for the South Central Tennessee Development District; an engineering historian, an architectural historian, a landscape historian and a park ranger for the National Park Service; and since returning to Tennessee in 2003, principal planner at Pawpaw, a Nashville-based natural and cultural resource planning firm. Richard’s background in history and historic preservation provides him with the specific skill sets needed for cultural resource assessment and management, while his work as a naturalist and park ranger affords him the ability to work on natural resouces projects. Strong research and writing skills, coupled with in-depth familiarity with historical holdings and archival sources, enables him to place projects in historical context. Work as an interpreter and tourism planner helps him develop meaningful and compelling interpretive panels and devices to explain the significance of any site. Projects include his Cultural Landscape Inventory for the Mumma Farm at Antietam National Battlefield, an Historic Structures Report for Rock Creek Recreational Area in the Cherokee National Forest for structures constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps for the U.S. Forest Service that outlined a strategy to restore the historic structures while meeting contemporary needs, an interpretive plan for historic resources at Tennessee’s Laurel Snow State Natural Area, and the recent Cultural Heritage Mining Trail in Southeast Tennessee.
Sherry Beard
Partner, Interpretive Specialist
In her role as resource specialist and placemaker at Pawpaw, Sherry combines her love of nature and the environment with her interest in history.  She understands the sensitive balance between capitalizing on a community’s assets and potential to bring benefits to the community and the people who live there while maintaining the uniqueness of place that they value. Sherry has over five years of hands-on experience with Pawpaw in natural and cultural resource inventory, economic and tourism development, and has helped craft interpretive plans for scenic byways and heritage resource projects. A former regional manager and trainer with Girl Scouts, Sherry is an avid outdoorswoman who treasures every opportunity to discover new places and to share them with others.  Her desire to share her outdoor experiences led her to become an outdoor living trainer for Girl Scouts to teach troop leaders the skills they need to nurture a love of the out-of-doors in the girls in their troops.  Additionally, Sherry was an advisor for a Venture Crew through Boy Scouts, a co-ed program for young adults with an emphasis on high adventure and leadership development. She has over 25 years as an accountant working for non- profit organizations to real estate developers as well as guiding small start-up businesses to success.  Sherry is a founder of the Duck River Watershed Association and has served as an officer and board member of several environmental/conservation groups, including Tennessee Scenic Rivers Association (TSRA).
Resource Economist
Angela Riffe
Angela hails from a rural, agrarian community in West Tennessee. As she watched her hometown’s bustling Main Street turn into a dilapidated No Man’s Land, it piqued her inquisitive nature to discover the differences between flourishing and floundering communities. Since then, she has taken the opportunity to travel and study in a diversity of cities from Bangkok, Thailand, Singapore, and across the US and Europe. Her background in economics, urban planning, and local internships allow her to fully access the complexities of economic vitality in urban spaces. As pastime has grown into profession, Angela dived in with both feet as a resource economist for Pawpaw Partners at their Nashville office. Angela uses her rich experiences to color her perspective as she pursues master’s degrees in public policy and planning. At Pawpaw, Angela has specialized in developing and conducting visitor surveys, collecting demographic information, and data analysis.
Outdoor Recreation Specialist
Carley Lester
Carley grew up hunting and fishing in Middle Tennessee. He obtained his Eagle Scout, BSA in 1975.  Boy Scout camping trips and canoeing the Duck River began to shape his love of the outdoors and natural environment. An opportunity to backpack at Philmont Scout Ranch in northern New Mexico, as a scout, led to a return for backcountry employment at Philmont in 1979.  While attending college at The University of Tennessee in Knoxville, TN, abundant opportunities for mountain expeditions, in all seasons, were enjoyed.   After graduating UTK in 1979 with a degree in Agriculture, he worked as a herdsman on a large cattle and row crop farm in Mt. Pleasant, Tennessee before returning to eastern Tennessee in 1985.  Since 1985, passion for the environment and natural resources has found Carley hiking, camping and fishing in and around Cherokee National Forest Lands.  An agricultural sales career allowed much travel around the areas of eastern Tennessee from Mountain City to Knoxville and even more exploration.  Carley lived on the Nolichucky River in Greene County for 22 years, and spent much free time pursuing smallmouth bass and trout from kayaks or wading. During this time, ATV and UTV travel supplemented hiking. He obtained a private pilot certificate in 1994 and enjoyed flying over many remote areas he had hiked and many more that would be visited later. Carley now resides in Gray in Washington County, Tennessee and teaches Agriculture at Daniel Boone High School.  Environment and Natural Resources curricula, which includes classes in Forestry Management, Plant and Soil Science, and Wildlife Management and Recreation, allows him to instill in his students his passion for natural resource conservation and to teach a balance of anthropocentric and biocentric views of natural resources.  He has taken students on day field trips into wilderness unimproved environments which he hopes will begin to broaden their view of the natural world around them. Students are able to see, hands on-minds on, watersheds they have mapped and areas they have viewed on topographic maps. The reaction of students on these trips has led to an exploration of regulations related to a hiking guide service he hopes to pursue in the future. He is a member of the American Chestnut Foundation, Ducks Unlimited, Asheville Botanical Gardens, and the National Association of Agriculture Educators.  Carley’s outdoor recreation experience and his experience as an educator makes him an ideal addition to the Pawpaw team.  He helps us demonstrate that outdoor recreation opportunities can help craft a strong outdoor tourism component.