© 2016 Pawpaw Partners, all rights reserved

Cheatham County Tourism Plan and Targeted

Economic Strategy

Located on Nashville’s doorstep, tiny Cheatham County, Tennessee maintains an essentially rural character but has major economic challenges as a large majority of its workforce is employed outside the county.  Pawpaw’s tourism plan not only outlined strategies to promote the county’s outdoor and recreational resources, but utilized gap analysis to help local economic development staff target specific businesses to grow the county’s tourism sector.   

Sequatchie Valley State Scenic Byway Corridor

Management Plan

Few landscapes in the Southeast compare with the Sequatchie Valley which cuts in a straight line for more than sixty miles down the core of the Cumberland Plateau.  Working with project partners, Pawpaw inventoried and assessed intrinsic resources throughout the Valley, determined the route for a byway and “scenic sideways” to take visitors to attractions off the main route, and developed strategies for marketing corridor resources.   

“High Adventure in the Tennessee Highlands”

Sustainable Tourism Plan

Seeking to encourage responsible tourism based on the natural resources of three Upper Cumberland counties in order to help encourage appreciation for them and their long-term preservation, the Tennessee Parks & Greenways Foundation engaged Pawpaw to develop a sustainable tourism plan that would not only identify adventure tourism and outdoor recreational resources, but which would promote their use as an economic development tool for these isolated mountain counties.   
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natural and cultural resources planning

Minnesota Great River Road National Scenic

Byway Corridor Management Plan

Working with partners Kimley-Horn and Associates, Pawpaw conducted a comprehensive GIS-based survey of all resources along the 525-mile Minnesota segment of the Great River Road of America paralleling the Mississippi River, completed a sign survey, prepared the visual protection plan component and assessed visitor impressions.  The CMP will guide protection of byway resources and promote development within the corridor.   

Cultural Heritage Mining and Metals

Manufacturing Tour of Southeast Tennessee

Mining for coal, copper and iron, and related industries such as coke production and metals manufacturing, was long the backbone of the economy of the 10-county Southeast Tennessee region.  Pawpaw prepared an interpretive driving tour featuring twenty-eight sites associated with these industries, along with an overview history and content for the Southeast Tennessee Tourism Association website and the SETTA mobile app.   

Preservation, Maintenance and Interpretation

Plan for Laurel-Snow State Natural Area

The Laurel-Hill State Natural Area unit of the Cumberland Trail State Park contains a myriad of resources associated with the Dayton Coal & Iron Company.  Abandoned mines, hundreds of coke ovens, railway structures and other features associated with the DCI era have long puzzled visitors to this stunning natural area known for its majestic waterfalls.  Pawpaw prepared a plan to preserve and interpret these resources associated with what was once one of Tennessee’s largest employers.   
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selected projects

planning for special places

Pawpaw specializes in projects that combine natural or recreational resources and cultural landscapes.  With decades of experience in historic preservation, outdoor education and cultural resource management, we are ideally suited to help clients preserve, interpret and promote significant resources.  We want visitors not to just see special places, but to experience them.
Wayne County Tourism Plan and Targeted Economic Strategy Wayne County is an emerging center for adventure tourism. and is well-suited to take advantage of this growing trend with its prized location of the Tennessee and Buffalo rivers, its vast wildlife management areas, and the Natchez Trace Parkway.  The county offers opportunities for paddling, open water fishing, horseback riding and equestrian trail rides, and off-road motorcycling.  The Wayne County Tourism Project outlines strategies to enhance adventure tourism opportunities as well as to promote the county’s historic sites, three unique municipalities and other tourism opportunities.      
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Duck River Blueway Feasibility Study
Tennessee’s Duck River is the longest river entirely within the state of Tennessee, and has been recognized as the most biologically diverse river in North America.  More than 71 miles, nearly a quarter of the river’s length, is in Hickman County, but there are very few public access sites. This study determined a “Blueway” or water trail could be established across the county, but will depend on willing landowners who would consider lease or sale of land for river access sites.
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selected projects
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Cheatham County

Tourism Plan and

Targeted Economic

Strategy

Located on Nashville’s doorstep, tiny Cheatham County, Tennessee maintains an essentially rural character but has major economic challenges as a large majority of its workforce is employed outside the county.  Pawpaw’s tourism plan not only outlined strategies to promote the county’s outdoor and recreational resources, but utilized gap analysis to help local economic development staff target specific businesses to grow the county’s tourism sector.   

Sequatchie Valley

State Scenic Byway

Corridor Management

Plan

Few landscapes in the Southeast compare with the Sequatchie Valley which cuts in a straight line for more than sixty miles down the core of the Cumberland Plateau.  Working with project partners, Pawpaw inventoried and assessed intrinsic resources throughout the Valley, determined the route for a byway and “scenic sideways” to take visitors to attractions off the main route, and developed strategies for marketing corridor resources.   

“High Adventure in

the Tennessee

Highlands”

Sustainable Tourism

Plan

Seeking to encourage responsible tourism based on the natural resources of three Upper Cumberland counties in order to help encourage appreciation for them and their long-term preservation, the Tennessee Parks & Greenways Foundation engaged Pawpaw to develop a sustainable tourism plan that would not only identify adventure tourism and outdoor recreational resources, but which would promote their use as an economic development tool for these isolated mountain counties.   
read more read more read more read more read more read more

Great River Road of

Minnesota National

Scenic Byway Corridor

Management Plan

Working with partners Kimley-Horn and Associates, Pawpaw conducted a comprehensive GIS-based survey of all resources along the 525-mile Minnesota segment of the Great River Road of America paralleling the Mississippi River, completed a sign survey, prepared the visual protection plan component and assessed visitor impressions.  The CMP will guide protection of byway resources and promote development within the corridor.   

Cultural Heritage

Mining and Metals

Manufacturing Tour

Mining for coal, copper and iron, and related industries such as coke production and metals manufacturing, was long the backbone of the economy of the 10-county Southeast Tennessee region.  Pawpaw prepared an interpretive driving tour featuring twenty-eight sites associated with these industries, along with an overview history and content for the Southeast Tennessee Tourism Association website and the SETTA mobile app.   

Preservation,

Maintenance and

Interpretation Plan for

Laurel-Snow SNA

The Laurel-Hill State Natural Area unit of the Cumberland Trail State Park contains a myriad of resources associated with the Dayton Coal & Iron Company.  Abandoned mines, hundreds of coke ovens, railway structures and other features associated with the DCI era have long puzzled visitors to this stunning natural area known for its majestic waterfalls.  Pawpaw prepared a plan to preserve and interpret these resources associated with what was once one of Tennessee’s largest employers.   
read more read more read more read more read more read more